Spout Podcast
Spout Podcast

Episode 39 · 4 months ago

Nick Cannon

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Nick Cannon is a multi-generational and multi-format entertainer. From his music, hosting and producing, to broadcasting and interviewing (and that’s just a Monday for him), Nick has amassed one of the most diverse audiences of any entertainer to date. 

In Episode 38, the father of seven talks about what keeps him going, how he plans ahead for the success in front of him, and the importance of comedy and satire in today’s culture.

...the entertainment business is a ruthless one. To say, the road to success in the industry is filled with some pitfalls, would be an understatement. But if and that's a big if you can weather the storm and come through the other side a whole new challenge awaits now yurt known, what do you do with all these new eyes on you? Do you stay in your lane or do you branch out and show the world just exactly how much you can do in the case of Nick Cannon, there was only one clear choice. Nick Cannon is a multigenerational entertainer and quite literally the definition of hustle. He was born in 1980 in san Diego California and raised mainly by his grandfather. As a teenager, Cannon got his first big break by performing stand up on a local cable access program run by his father. Shortly after he found himself as a cast member on the Nickelodeon Show All that ah which also spawned guest spots on keenan and kel and eventually led to his own Nickelodeon show, The Nick Cannon Show, which he also wrote and executive produced. Originally wanted to be a music producer. His group opened for the likes of Will smith 98 degrees and Lfo Cannon signed with Jive Records in 2001 and released his debut album in 2003 By 2000 and five Cannon had launched his own label Can Eyeball Records through which he planned to release his follow up album stages though, that album never saw the light of day. This happened in part because of cannons exploding acting career throughout the early two thousand's Nick Cannon could be seen in a multitude of films including Men in Black to Love, Don't cost a thing shall We Dance and most notably Drumline, which was a leading role for Canon Spring boarding him into the spotlight. Fast forward to 2005 and Nick was creating writing, executive producing and hosting his own show Wild N Out, which is still on air today. Basic rules for your house, let's go. What While the night would give Nick Cannon even more of an audience would eventually open up opportunities to host things like award shows, parades, countdowns and eventually America's got talent. Nick Cannon was the host of the hit show from 2009 to 2016, after which he took some time to get back to school and graduate in 2020 from Howard University with a bachelor of Science, criminology, administration of justice and a minor in africana Studies. Currently, Nick Cannon hosts his own radio show syndicated through Scada Networks, still host, exact produces and writes for Wild and Out. Is the...

...host of the masked singer is still producing and releasing music, still making sketches, writing comedy as the father of seven Children. Quite literally makes coast to coast trips on a weekly basis and just launched a new daytime television show. The crazy part. He has no plans of slowing down anytime soon. Like I said, truly the definition of hustle, my name is eric Zachary, This is the spot podcast where famous people spot off about more than their famous for and today that's nick cannon, Nick cannon. How are you man? I'm good man. How are you? Good. I'm excited for this because you and I have worked adjacent a little bit. Okay. We have similar colleagues. I worked with Dc young fly and Justina valentine on trl on tv. Yeah, so I saw you in the hallway like super briefly once was like, hey, what's up man? And then I mean we're both busy and you're all over the place, but absolutely this is a long time coming. So I'm excited to have this conversation with you. It's like one specific question. All right, here we go. One specific question. Then the conversation go wherever we want with it. You are quite literally a multigenerational entertainer Meaning you have an audience from basically every decade for the last 30, 40 years. I'll take that I'll take that. Which means with that comes though the ability to kind of pivot between the different scopes of entertainment, what the landscape looks like. What do you think entertainment is gonna look like In five years and 10 years because it's changed drastically in two years. Well when we're stepping just the endless possibility of creativity man, I think, I mean we've all grown up watching movies like total recall back to the future and like you know, and even ready player one like, like that's that's what entertainment is an experience now like and even what, you know, as as a father like I'm watching I'm watching My son um play Fortnite and it's an entertainment amusement park concert. Like this is where he learns all his dances, this is where he knows all the new songs, that's where he is, where he meets his friends, this is where he learns about fashion and I got to shoot a gun. Like it's a it's a great storyline like to me and even like because he's 10, so I'm a fan of like Grand theft Auto, like it's been a fan of Grand theft Auto and so like I'm sorry I got a few more years before before we can share that together. But it's like just think about how entertaining Grand theft Auto is and because Grand theft Auto pulls from the likes of like Boyz in the hood and it's just some of my favorite films uh and music like the like the music budget soundtracks in gaming, insane like, like I've got a couple of those checks, those are like way better. You're like where was this when I was starting? Like there's way better than record label checks, There's people making...

...music for video games that are making way more money than all your favorite artists, you know what I mean? And it's just it's just like so experiential intellectual properties is where everything's going, we're literally going to be putting on these, you know, VR goggles and that and when you put them on Will smith is going to be in there, Arnold Schwarzenegger is going to be in there, J lo, going to be in there and you're gonna be able to do whatever you want to do with it, whatever you want to do whatever you want to do. Hopefully it shake their hand and have a conversation. If not, you know, you're you're in your own goggles. I'm glad you brought up Will smith man, because there's a couple of articles floating around from a long time ago where you quoted, is it the G four dope Bomb Squad, did I get that weird that that always comes back up because I don't know where they got it from, but like, I think somebody took like five different stories together because like, two minutes at a rap group called The Bomb Squad, you know, that I used to and I got the opportunity to open up for so many people because I was literally like a teenager fresh out of high school, they literally were trying to be outcast, you know what I mean? Like, as like a young west coast teenage version of outcasts and I feel like the Gs, because I think they've tried to put like Chingy, I saw that, I'm like there's no way that's true, wait, where they came up with this bizarre story, but I wasn't a rap group called The Bomb Squad and literally like I actually was the producer, like I never wanted to be the front guy. Like I never was looking to be on, I was more fascinated by the process of like even with television, I was you know, my dad had a cable access show and I was I went through all of the workshops and everything to be the crew. Like you did you did stand up on that stage. Yeah, well that was you know, that was just for fun, trying to stay out of that was after you already learning the back end. Yeah, but like my goal, like I was really into production. Like I wanted to be a television producer, I wanted to be a music producer. Like I had artists in high school, like I was signed literally like for lunch money, I was signed like all the rappers and you know, produced beats on them and put these little mixtape compilations together and sell them out trunk of our mom's car. And you thought your label deal was sketchy. Wait till you're giving up your applesauce, literally signing people for lunch money. Uh and like designing our artwork, but that was you know, I was really impressed by the likes of like Jermaine Dupri and Didi and Russell Simmons and I would see all of those, I'm like oh I want to do that for my community. I have the ability to, you know, I was, you know, multifaceted musician and really was in the deejaying and stuff like that, but I never wanted to be, you know, on camera, but like the stand up thing kind of just took off for me, which started off as a hobby and then that opened up the doors to allow me to do all of the other stuff. But you know, that was my goal was to be like the next Jermaine...

Dupri or p Diddy. Like that was always my, my dream. Let's talk about the musicianship for a second because again, rumor like, you can't believe anything. We know this. I'm sure I want to get it straight. Why not? I have the source. Do you play seven instruments? Yeah, I mean that's even like you put a number on it. It's like I grew up in church so you can play with, are they counting the triangle then two or three? But that's like, what do you consider? Like, how do you count the number? It's like whatever. It's like when you think about the vibe of, of when you like, if you know how to play a piano, then you know, you probably can mess around on the Oregon. If you know how to play a guitar, you can play the bass being a drummer, you rhythms syncopated. So like, you know, I would say my main interest meant that I love the most and probably the most passionate for is the piano and then when you have the understanding of theory and all of that stuff, you can pretty much, I could pick, I can pick anything up and make it make noise. You know what I mean? Like give me, give me long enough with it. And you know, my, my grandfather was a a a win instrumentalist. So he played clarinet, saxophone, trombone. Like he, he was flu. So like even like when you know how to make those things work. Anything. Yeah, anything. I don't know where the number seven came from, but I can, I can make a lot of instruments sound good. So what's, what's an instrument you picked up and you went, no, that was not for me. Maybe I respect, honest to be really good at the Oregon. Yeah, it takes a lot of work. I thought of maybe five different instruments of ahead of what you were gonna say, Oregon is not that, but it makes sense because you've got all the pedals and the air compressions and things and like, because you think you could just take everything from piano and apply it. But it's, it's, it's actually more difficult. So you won't catch nick cannon playing the theme. So I got a baseball game any time. Like that's probably like the one thing I could figure out how to play. But like when I watched, like even like at church, when you see people in Oregon, like that's impressive. But yeah, other than that, I think, you know, I can fare pretty, I mean you probably wouldn't want to put pick up the freaking tuba either. Like just in general, not going to play it, but I think it's awkward. Especially, you know, having the marching band where I always felt bad for the tubers, they had to be big dudes. Like it's just carrying their biggest thing around. It's crazy. Yeah, I mean, we've heard the story right? Like you were, you were willing to play drums already knew drums, picked it up even more for drum line. Yeah, that was the same vibe. You know what I mean? Like I messed around on it so I could I could make it sound good, I could do a couple of cadences and stuff. But like when I got the role, I mean, I remember them actually like, yo can you play drums? Like absolute hell yeah, I can play drums, drums do whatever you want me to be a star of a movie. So uh but I mean, did you go into like rudiments and learning that kind of stuff? Especially once we got the job because I wanted one, I wanted to prove to everybody...

...that I could play drums, you know what I mean? So I didn't want to be like, look like I lied to the casting director. So I kind of, which by the way, anyone who's ever auditioned for anything you lie first and you learn it later. Like, like if you ever look at any actor's resume they have under the skills thing that she's like right at the very bottom. They have all types of bullsh like archery. I think mindset rollerblading for some reason. I thought that was gonna help my career as a child actor. Catherine was like wow, he does archery, We gotta get this guy in here. I would love a world where Nick Cannon auditioned for like hunger games. I'm nice with this bow and arrow ship. Oh man, I wanna, I wanna Selfishly talk about the hustle because I mean it's no secret that you are a man with 1,001 jobs. I mean you were quite literally coast to coast on a daily basis. So when um you know when life hits, when it doesn't, when things are going good, when it's going bad, when people are talking ship but there then you know when they're you're on the top of a mountain, what centers you through all of that? Oh I mean the hustle just like you said, the constant drive to keep going. If you let any of that noise slow you down or stop you, you're on the wrong frequency. Like you got it like that's that's slow down, stuck in the mud, low frequency energy that I try to avoid. I'm aware of it. Like you know there's a low frequency below you but you just try to get to the highest frequency and the way you get to the highest frequency is just don't stop, keep pushing, stay motivated, keep moving, so what drives the hustle, I think it's reciprocal, I think they feed into each other because I always say I got to keep cooking while the pot is hot, like I really feel like I'm blessed with the opportunity that a lot of people don't get, so I got to take full advantage of it so that I come from that I come from, you know, even like when you think of stand up, like you had to do everything, you gotta write your jokes, you gotta perform your act, you have to promote yourself, they give you like seven tickets to sell or you can't go on stage, like you got to literally get seven people to come and come to the comedy club, otherwise you don't get no time like, so you got to figure out how to market yourself, how to promote, So, coming from that and then coming from, you know, my dad was a hustler, you know, like I come from a long line of like people from the community that really cared about the community and ministers and making something out of nothing and uplifting and you know, a community activist type of mentality, so all of that combined together and then you put, you know, entrepreneurial spirit on top of it, it's like yo I'm I'm just, I'm gonna go for what I know and it rings true, you know, we, we have some similarities where you know, we both work in tv, you have nick cannon radio and I think a lot of people here a radio show and if it's a good radio show they pay attention right there like, okay this is fire, this is good, it wouldn't be unfair to to think that people just the general public here, that maybe he's just using...

...what he used on tv or it's it's the same energy and it's a different world. Well, I mean like because I mean first of all I have such a great respect for broadcast and if anything having studied it and come up like I said all the way from cable access to being interns at the radio stations and yeah, shouts out to like Z 90 in SAn Diego and power 106 in L. A. Like even like I used to stand Outside Power one of six for like 15 years old with my demo tape and like literally people who are like rappers and producers and stuff now today that were also interns and working in, you know, so like I remember those days of like I just wanted to be on the radio to make people laugh, I just wanted to be, you know, hear my song played on, you know, even if it was local like those things and even cable access, so that process of having such a great respect specifically for the most intimate form of communication because the thing about radio and even podcasting is people feel like they know you, you get to you, they've let, they let you, they've given you their time, they let you in on their, their morning drive journey, they let you in on when they're traveling to see their family, like those things are so important. Uh, and you got to give them that same respect to not try to pull a fast one over on them. So if you just repurposing content on another platform, first of all, it's not just radio that doesn't work anywhere, like, you know, like if you notice like you could be like the biggest Youtuber in the world and you try to put that on twitter and you get no views or you could be like the biggest Tiktok, you know, influencer and you try to put that on instagram and it just doesn't work the same way. Like people respect their mediums and their platforms to be what they want. So as much as you can, you know, we're building the ultimate brand, but it's never, it's never, you never just want to repurpose stuff you want to speak the language of the platform and what you're dealing with and with radio being one of the original And, and like I said, one of the most in touch and intimate people want that real connection. So you know, every single day we in here, you know, six a.m. Just get into it and you know, like there's you know, there's obviously there's always tricks of the trade and shortcuts, but any time it doesn't feel authentic, then you're doing the wrong thing. This episode of the Spot podcast is brought to you by ritual. Protein powders can be intimidating, especially if you don't work out. But the fact is we all need protein. It's not just about muscles or bulking up. Protein helps support bone health. And as we go through life, protein needs to change to adapt to the stage of life. You're currently in rituals. Essential protein is not only delicious, it's plant based protein powder with three distinct formulas designed to meet the body's changing protein needs. I personally love the taste. It's not easy to find a protein powder that tastes good, but also has the right stuff in it. That's where ritual shuts off all the boxes you add water you shake and there's three...

...thoughtful formulas to choose from, depending what stage of life you're in all of which have 20 g of pea protein per serving. The daily shake 18 plus the daily shake, 50 plus and the daily shake, pregnancy and postpartum. So if you're ready to shake up your protein ritual right now, you get 10% off your first three months at ritual dot com slash spout ritual even offers a money back guarantee if you're not 100% in love again, 10% off your first three months by visiting ritual dot com slash spout. I saw the video when you were on power 106 and you were announcing that nick Cannon radio was getting syndicated in shoutout Skyview. I'm starting a syndicated show in january. Congratulations. Thanks man. I'm not saying that to pat myself on the back, I'm saying that because I'm in this moment curious what a mentor like yourself has to say. I saw the that twinkle in your eye, when you, when you say something like that, you can get handed the world, but when it's something you've been chasing for for that long. So any tips for anyone watching that's going for a syndication deal. But this is obviously more about me, but I'm curious about you, but even more in the sense, it was like, I would say this to anyone have a master plan, like don't just go into it as like, oh, like take advantage of the opportunity to be grateful. But like, even with one of the reasons why I was so excited about syndicated radio, because I also knew I had a syndicated talk show and also, you know, I've seen people be really successful in the space of dominating multimedia, you know what I mean? And being able to be present on multiple platforms. And that was always my master plan that was like, yo I want, you know, and having, having the likes of being able to have learned and set at the footstool of the howard Stern's and the steve harvey's and like knowing knowing these people on a personal level and watch having been having the opportunity to see how they move and and how their infrastructure and their team operates. I was like, oh I want that, I want to be able to do that and I know I'm willing to work just as hard, I know I'm willing to learn the skill sets and put in the time and the effort of what if there's something that I don't have innately I'm I'm willing to go chase it and go get it. So that's um having a master plan man, study your craft and have a real trajectory and where you see it because you know, syndication is great, but what are you going to do with it once you get it? You know what I mean? Because that you think that's the one thing you get uh you think that's like, oh I'm syndicated, I just sit back and the money's rolling in, it's like nah, that's where the work begins, like and that's why it is an opportunity. Only few can do because to be able to like you said to be able to relate to multiple demographics, multiple generations. It's not an easy task and you gotta you gotta learn that language, you gotta...

...learn um the you know that that savoir faire of being able to to be charismatic to multiple, multiple people but still be authentic to who you are and there's you know, there's very few people who, who have thread that needle and that's why they do get the big bucks, that's why they are the people that we know that operate that way, you know, you made a really good point about the multi platform and you know every medium has its own deserved respect of itself, you know, so someone like you that you know you are on so many different platforms and you are constantly, I can see it, I mean you know, as as brilliant and good as you are, you are still always working to polish it more. How soon do you jump on a new trend like like Tiktok just got announced, are you on it that day? It depends like, you know what I mean, like I remember being you know one of the first people on twitter but I wasn't one of the first people on instagram, I have been rocking with Tiktok since they were musically that was something man. So I was, you know, I kind of always been on that wave and you know, it's interesting like even something like Youtube, like I remember I had a, I had a viral digital concept show before, there was Youtube, like I was on uh created this thing called short circuits, it was going to be where it was, it was a spin off a while and out, we were using all of our talent and the whole vibe was like, we were making shorts, you know, at the time, that's what we called, It was like two minutes skits. Uh and we were kind of stringing them together. The only thing that the only reference I really had was like, you know, like a bunch of failed sketch shows from Comedy Central, or even like obviously the biggest one that we know is like in Living Color, which was the most successful of my generation. Where like something that, oh they would go do a parody music video, oh they would do a parody commercial, oh they do a parody movie trailer, was like, yo imagine if we did that. Um and you know, we put it out there, put it on the internet, you know what I mean? And like that the mechanism, even though it was a tv show, the mechanism is that we were presenting this and like this circuit city type of store that these shorts will pop up on the different screens and on your computers and all of that stuff. And we were taking, we wanted people to make them, we have people making Skits at their house and sending it to them. And and we were saying those were our audience, and this was like, this was before, I mean, I think it was 2004. Yeah, so it was kind of like this, like I had no knowledge of it but I was like damn we was onto something like you know it was MTV and I was like you know they they they greenlit it off of the strength of wilding out and all the talent that we have. But I don't think people saw my vision of like what I was really trying to do and we did some funny as sh it but it was like even if it didn't it didn't resonate like you know what do...

...you do when it doesn't resonate when you know it's a good idea, maybe you're ahead of the time. I just didn't have the platform man. Like it was like you know how do you be okay with that though when you have this idea who saw it? I mean it still came on after a while and out people thought it was funny but it was we were trying to make it go viral before going viral was a thing. You know what I mean? We just like I remember like we did a skit and I was uh we did it was that was around the time where Kanye uh said George Bush doesn't like black people. So we did a diss record from George Bush to Kanye and we got like a George Bush impersonator. Like did the shot the whole music video we had like you know Dick Cheney? I had like the gap in the back and Condoleezza Rice was twerking like it was hilarious, like it was, it was amazing and like we had like hired like a real dude who was like an impersonator of uh you know George bush at the time. And I remember like I wanted Kanye, like I went to Kanye, I was like yo he's like yo that's hilarious but like yo the president really doesn't like me, like you're joking around about it, but like this is national security Dick, but like they don't like, like I'm not playing around with this. He was like so you could go put that out and everything. I was like no, but if you put this out on like one of your skits and like, you know at the time I think Kanye had like this was when everybody had blogs and that's that's all, you know like it was more like I wanted him to kind of put it up on one of his, you know on his website and he was like yeah he's like no I'm not doing that, but it's like but it aired on MTV, you know like we did some funny man like we did like, you know uh Mikey Day was now you know one of the stars and writers of SnL uh started with us uh and Taran Killam the same thing we did a skit called the Clay mates and it was literally like Clay Akins big biggest fans like Clay akin fan club, they had a public access show and no matter who they had on the show, all they were asking about was clay making, and it's like, it's the claim eight show, the claim eight show, and it was like the funniest most bizarre ever. But like that that like to me it had the in between two ferns before there was before, it was that, you know what I mean, like, saying like, same tone all of that, and I was like, wow, we was we was on this stuff like we had we had a kevin Hart and and ap on Crockett do this like, like PBS style debate show called, I'd hit that and then just like pictures come up like R. Two D. Two, and he's like, yes, I'd hit R. Two D. Two and he would project porn onto the wall. Like, it was just like, that would be so, but it was just like, like we was so ahead of our time and so I was just happy to be like, that was like, yo they paying us to act stupid and come up with ideas,...

...so we wasn't even thinking about like ratings like that, just like most influencers and people were, you know, making stuff on, you know, these platforms aren't think they're doing it because they're having fun with their friends and you know, if it goes viral and you know, they they get an agent or a manager and somebody's like, yo you can make money doing this like. Yeah, but like most people start out, especially comedians man, he started because he just wanted to have fun and make people laugh and I knew about the George bush distract because Dc showed that to me and D. C. Learned this from you. He credits you but he said study your craft, you know, research, watch the stand up specials but don't just watching the last like pay attention what they're doing the timing. And I remember him telling me about that one. No man, we did some funny funny stuff like, like and even stuff like really like, like next level that we were thinking like we got I did a skit with nas like when he was doing the whole hip hop is dead and we did like this like black face minstrel show rap group that were like and everything. But it was like really to the point where it was like people were posting and doing debates about it because and this was before, this was before, you know, you know like I said this was early two thousand's but making a statement like yo if y'all keep keep going and at this rate this is what hip hop will be in the future and it was like really just a lot of satire and social commentary that we are still experiencing and talking about to this day but and we didn't that was the time like obviously you couldn't do that today, you know what I mean? Like it was stuff that we was doing back then, like you could not get away with and we, you know, it was a fun time. It was, we're doing civil rights, uh celebrity basketball games, like, like Harriet tubman was a cheerleader, I can't touch this, but I'm just saying like that's the type of stuff he was doing and you couldn't obviously you could not do that now. Uh people are just way too sensitive, but like, but back then, like we was on MTV like at 8:00 doing this type of stuff. It was crazy. We'll wrap up on that then because I I do have no place, how do we move it and and roll with the punches of the sensitivity in comedy now, man, do you think we'll ever come back from it all hail dave chappelle? Well, you know what I mean? Like the people who are fearless, I mean as someone who is definitely had my, my my brush many times with, you know, cancel culture and you know, um been on multiple sides of different debates, you know what I mean? When you get to what you can't say and what's insensitive and one thing I value and man, I try to share this story and just, I can't, I think they will, they will pick it up, you know, in, in in retrospect, but while ng out is the...

...most progressive show on television and has been for over a decade for almost almost two, and I say that just to say it because when you think about there's no other place on television where you can have people from completely different walks of life, say the most harsh, outrageous, outrageous, unapologetic stuff to each other, like we literally would have someone from the transgender community battle rap someone who is homophobic and they and just watch it happen, but at the end of the day, they hug it out, you know what I mean? Or you can watch someone from, you know, make a Middle Eastern joke to someone who's not even Middle Eastern who's in who's indian, you know, he's an agent and like, and it's so, you know, it's it's ignorant in the sense, but it's like, oh we all say that, you know, like shout out to timothy daly ghetto, who probably caught probably more asian hate on wiling out than I've ever witnessed and for him to be so brilliant and strong and have the better comebacks to could finish somebody's, you know, offensive crass, low frequency joke before they could, and then top it with something even more brilliant and like yo that's, that's how you handle differences, that's how you handle ignorance, that's how you handle stereotypes. I think um you know, Ozzy, Ozzy Davis uh said you should never fear stereotypes, you should fear what people do with them, you know what I mean? In that sense because we're all different, we're all but when when you embrace your differences and say look, you would wear that sweater, I wouldn't wear that. I put this on today and he's gonna he's gonna comment on this. I knew it, I knew it the second I put it on, man wanted to be the Freddy Krueger a podcast and but I wouldn't do that. But I can acknowledge that you are brave enough to wear that sweater. That is the nicest way to hit on a sweater. But I can acknowledge that it works for you in your mind but but like we joke, but that's the brilliance of Wild now, but as soon as you do something out of hate or malice, that's when we should protest. That's when we should protect when you're doing something that's so dark and low frequency that I was like man, that was hateful. But when you're doing something with your friends and like think about it like man, we call our friends dumbass jerks and stupid ass and like all my friends worse yeah, saying like all of that type of stuff, but you don't mean that's your friend, you know what I mean? Like me and Kevin Harlan, we put uh pick up the phone like yo what's your ugly as doing right now, like but he knows I love him and you're like that's how we talk to each other, you know what I mean? Like, like, so that's in that same sense, that's...

...what you see on Wild n Out, that's what you saw at birth. So I believe that's how you get to a space of dealing with sensitivity because we should be sensitive, we should be concerned, we should be as we're improving and growing and learning, there should be certain things that you can't say if and understand like, oh that's built, that's in hate and if you don't have the knowledge of that, then you shouldn't speak on that, you know? And I felt I've watched some of the toughest comedians, some of the most homophobic people, some of the most uh insecure individuals on wiling out grow and evolve and become friends and family with people that they would never speak to, you know what I mean? And like and even like I see people like, you know Maddie on the show shout out to Maddie, like she's like called the the Brave white soul, like because she stands out and will say whatever like she said on that show that like yo if like even I still see trending on twitter, like yo I can't believe you said that like uh like I remember when she was Wild style one time on like word first season and she's like something something you know, I like to rip the mic uh but I don't even know who to go at because you all look alike was like yo she just said that to a bunch of black people that's brilliant and fearless, but because we had been training and working with each other and she was our sister. And so we let it happen, we wouldn't let nobody out on the street say that shipped to us, but we hugged her for that and like definitely like put her on her shoulders, but like yo because that's what the show is about, so I hopefully only could continue to create content and platforms to where I can give people opportunities to two to push the limit to be themselves, to be artists to to have the ability to be the next George Carlin's or Dave chappelle's or Richard Pryor is because we need those people, we need, you know, that's the purpose for satire, that's the purpose for you know, comedy to hold that mirror up to society to society and like look at you looking idiots are doing like like that's and and we all got to we are all those people, you know what I mean, because we all take ourselves too seriously. We all are sensitive and rightly so we're in such a time where the paradigm is shifting and and we don't know where the solid ground is. So everyone has an opinion, everyone has something to say and when someone can do it in an artistic way and put time and thought into it, those are the people we should pay attention to nick, there's one before I completely say goodbye, I just need people to know that I don't know how many people recognize from a tv production side, how fast and furious wilding out happens because I mean I think they think it's a season, it happens once a week, we're talking multiple shows a day, three a day, three a day and we could do like 30 in...

...two weeks if when we're getting it right and that's all like that's like when you, when you're playing with the dream team, you know what I mean? Like when you even or not even dreaming when you're the Dallas cowboys or you know what I mean? Like when you're like a team that's that's locked in and and know each other like the back of your hands, All you're doing is having fun and that preparation, that rehearsal that, you know the off season of just working your muscles is no matter, you turn the camera and we're gonna get to it and and as quick as we can do an episode, that's years and months of preparation, of mastering your craft, nick dude to say you are a busy man is an understatement. So I I appreciate the time, I appreciate the intelligent conversation and thank you. Thanks man, I'll send you a sweater of your own to see more of eric Zachary's conversation with nick Cannon follow spout underscore podcast on I G or twitter or at spout podcast dot com next week. Gayle spouts off. I could care less if he's heard it or not because that wasn't about him. It was about me taking ownership of my feelings and the things that he did and holding him accountable for his actions, but none of that was to like for him. It was all for me. You know. The spout podcast is presented by Alpha Media and created by Phil Becker.

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