Spout Podcast
Spout Podcast

Episode · 7 months ago

JP Saxe

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Not too long ago, we were hoarding toilet paper, hunting for hand sanitizer, and spending our days 6 feet apart. During this unfamiliar and scary time, there was a song that helped us reprioritize - a song with a message that made us stop, think, and bury any grudges we might have - that song was from JP Saxe.

JP joins us to talk about his Grammy-winning grandfather's influence, advice for his younger self, and spouts off on his passion for board games, sushi, and John Mayer.

...not too long ago we were hoarding toilet Paper hunting for hand sanitizer and spending our days 6ft apart and during this unfamiliar and scary time there was a song that helped us re prioritize a song with a message that made us stop think and bury any grudges. We might have. That song was from JP Saxe fans around the world have told JP directly that his song has repaired their relationship. It's even fired up conspiracy theorists who have accused him of having advanced knowledge of the pandemic sacks, shrugs this off and says, I don't even know what the illuminati is. J. P. Then re recorded the song with several artists including Sam smith, her Nile horn Alessia, Cara Kasha and former Spot podcast guests, Phineas, Jason Derulo and Anthony ramos all lending their voice to benefit Doctors without borders, but if the...

...world all our fears would be irrelevant. The song was later nominated for a Grammy Award which led JP's songwriting collaborations to include john Mayer and Maren Morris. I apologize, I just said it cousin as a self described weirdo kid from Canada JP has often said he has too many feelings and not many friends. He considers his music to be the first place. He figured out what it meant to have a relationship with himself. My my name is eric Zachary. This is the Spot podcast where famous people spout off about more than their famous for today. That's Jonathan percy Starker...

Sachs JP Sachs JP Saxe. Thanks for having me. I'm doing great. Yeah, Well let's explain the avocado incident really great. It's pretty simple. I'm trying to cut an avocado and it didn't go as planned. No, we didn't want any thumb on the toast. Yeah, but you're, you're doing okay. You can still have the right hand to play piano. Yeah, I mean, I've got, it'll be fine. We'll figure I want to go from here to the hospital to the show. It's gonna be badass so long. Yeah. Who's sensitive singer, songwriters could be rock stars and you've gone through, you have a story now, you know on stage. Yeah, yeah, yeah, I'll for sure tell the story on stage. How could I not? I want to hear the story of your grandfather really quick. Okay. We were just talking about him because yeah, yeah. And how, whether it takes skill or not and I was reminded of my grandfather because it was his favorite game is Janos janos Starker, not known for yacht Z known for the cello, but are world renowned cellist to Yeah, yeah. He was amazing, extremely, extremely inspiring and intimidating. A professor at the University of Utah classes there,...

Wild man and he has a grammy, which was, I own it bequeathed to you, I own the Grammy. I don't have a Grammy, but I own a Gram you were nominated for a grammy. I, I have a Grammy nominee metal. Okay, I own a Grammy trophy. Haven't earned it yet. So what was it like? I mean, obviously you're growing up with music from every aspect. What do you remember most about your grandfather, whenever you're on stage or recording or writing, is there something that comes to mind? Hungarian salami? He loved it. Okay. Also, oh he, when I started playing the cello, which I was horrible and he told me I was too old to start Um when I was 12, uh but he took me under his under his wing and would bring me two classes, which was really special. So when I quit the cello, two years later, we had already built that relationship and I got into jazz and got into pop and was he mad at you quit the chiller? No, he was like, no, it's not your thing at the end of his life. Uh someone told me that he...

...had been watching the voice to try and get an understanding of the music world that I was in, which is extremely sweet. He was trying to stay with the times, which is awesome. Music never goes out of time. His music will never go to time. The ability to elicit that much beauty and nuance from a, for the most part single noted instrument is just mystical to me. I have so many ways to do it right, I got words, I've got melodies. I've got production instrumentation, there's so many choices that can lead to the emotion. I'm trying to get into a song as a cellist, you're playing for the most part, someone else's repertoire that so many other people have played and you're finding an emotionally that no one else has, that makes you the greatest of all time. And that's what my grandfather did. It truly. It's a magic trick in my opinion. It's very cool to hear you talk about him because you could just tell like he exuded so fast forwarding. Well I should say every winning but fast forwarding from when you left the cello around 2013, you're fresh off a trip to L. A. You were spending time in L. A. And you were writing with and and working with Andy Rose. This is an extremely well prepared interview. Thank you so impressed. What's your mindset when you...

...get back to Canada and you're going, okay, this is like my first real taste of like having and living the writing world. I mean at that time I was just wide eyed and stoked and just naively happy about every adventure. Like nothing felt like, Like it felt like 70% the struggle. No, 30% the struggle, 70% just an adventure. Like whether it was sleeping in my car or like going to random open mics to try and make friends so I can sleep on their couch is just, I don't know, it's all very exciting. Try and maintain that energy. But I got back to Toronto and a lot happened. But I think from the moment I left L. A. I knew I was going to try and find a way to get back and live there? And I've lived there ever since. So if you could go back to that kid in 2013 2014, you're playing drinks underground and Hugh's room and all that with the band and you're doing the rehearsals, What would you tell that kid? Mhm. Uh take time because every part of it's gonna be fun in its own way and don't...

...don't try and rush past any of the steps because, You know, playing in the basement of my family house that no longer exists when like we were playing shows for 20 people and I wanted nine people in my band because I just wanted all of my friends to be there. Like jamming on whatever instruments like you have jam band, the band because I wanted everyone there. You know, like I think back on that and it was as joyful as this is like I'm living that kid's dreams, but I'd be stoked to live his life for a day now too. So it's all it's all part of it. I think when you're goal oriented, it's easy to really get caught up in like if I until I get there, it doesn't matter. Would you apply that knowledge, that strategy to your board game appearance, My philosophies about board games are quintessentially the opposite to my philosophy is about my career. We're talking just like people are like why do you bring it up board games? This is what we want to talk about. The real point of what I'm passionate about, that aren't my thing. Um So with music,...

I think for me, competition is not a valuable feeling. I'm not very competitive. I like just trying to be the most honed in version of myself and the music as I can be. I'm not, I don't know. My intensity comes in my passion for the craft more than anything else. But when it comes to board games, I am ruthless, ambitious. Like nothing stands between me and victory. What? It's intimidating. Coming from such a nice guy to you. Like, I will ruin your life over this game. Music. Like I'm truly not competitive at all. Just like trying to I'm grateful to do what I love. And I'd like to do it at the highest levels I possibly can. But like, I wanna see everyone win if we're playing ticket to ride. I do not want to see everyone else when I want to see everyone else. Like, truly decimated. I heard me banana grams. Heard you say ticket to ride. So are you more into some of the knottiest popular mainstream game? That's not as popular banana graham is one of my favorites. Yeah, that's for sure. Um as my friends in the room can attest banana grams.

It's hard to be there nodding their heads like, yeah, we like to play. But I usually let my friends win the first time. So they'll play with me again, hustler. Yeah, we don't play for money. We play for pride. And then I have a lot of pride in banana grams. So what's like the mainstream of like you've got, you know, sorry. You've got monopoly. You've got life, you know, that kind of stuff. What's your favorite of those banana grams ticket to ride cards against humanity? Okay. Those are my top three. Okay. Also like I like playing along to jeopardy But the high school jeopardy or the kid jeopardy. The ones you can win. The adult jeopardy. That's beyond me. You don't know like when the Grand Canyon was reinvented in a photo of Oklahoma of like 1938, I thought I was prepared for the ready man. I'm sure there's a painting of the Grand Canyon in Oklahoma somewhere. I guess so it's monopoly. Big thing in Canada. I should ask. We have it. I just had a bunch of these monopolies. Remember I had a blue jays, monopoly. So you get to the diagonal corner from go some people play is when you land on that you get all the money in the...

...middle. Some people play. No, you just land there. You're just chilling. I don't remember my main memory about monopolies is the one I cheat at like everyone's making fun of, you know, I remember having like cousins or friends come over and we're going to play monopoly. And I was the morning of like stash the monopoly money. I love it. I've never told anyone that before. Secrets man. I like the idea of you like visiting or funny like your parents house and you're like find like an old pair of pants and it's just like hundreds of monopoly money just chilling in there back in the day. It's very possible. It's very possible. JP sex man. Thank you. Thank you for having me. Of course man. Time to go get my thumb stitched up. I wish you did you have any other questions. Uh man, I don't want to cut you short. I have so many. All right. Let me have already cut one thing short today. That's such a dad joke. That's true. I heard you bring up sugar fish in an interview. The food. Yeah, it's like I probably go way more than I should they have that in Portland. No, they don't. I live in new york. I flew in for you...

...man for real. Yeah. You didn't fly And I literally flew in to talk to J. P. Okay, well then we have to talk about all the things. I just need real fast. There'll be another appointment. I cannot take you from your doctor's appointment. I just want to know. Okay. Sugar fish. You go to the L. A. One. Which one? Which location? Usually the one on sunset or the one on ventura. Nice. What's your go to do. You trust me? Like trust me doesn't make my own choices. You do. You don't trust them. Ala carte. You don't trust the one place that tells you to trust them. I don't, I think the people you should trust to the people who don't tell you to trust them. My dad always used to say that if someone says trust me don't trust them. I love how you're spinning like a conversation about sugar officials. Sushi place. By the way, if you're listening you don't know what that is to like the most wise advice possibly things a metaphor, everything. If you lean into it enough all of it. God I wish we had hours to talk. I've heard some of the best sushi if you like. Sushi is in um Portland. Yeah I had it the other day actually there was a spot that I got taken to come visiting too and I was like wow this is my girlfriend said bamboo sushi in Portland's favorite Sushi in the world. Panic check it out man. I don't think you get to go because of the show next...

...time. Next time chopsticks would probably a little hard right now to I can do I have one hand just because I can make you can make jokes chief. He's sex man. Thank you so much for thank you for having me next time you talk about that. Is that all the question was perfect. Yeah I don't want to miss the appointment next time and thank you for flying. I'll see you next time man. Okay, I'm in L. A. All the time. If you know what were the other questions? I don't really have questions. Honestly, I have quick notes. I'd like to just see where like conversations go. What are you talking about? Mayor actually about mayor john Mayer? Yeah, real quick one last question cause you got to play late show Stephen Colbert with Mayor after of course like medium working with him. Why not? Did it live up to the hype? Cause I assume that's something that like 2010 2011 2012 J. P is like, I would love to play with john 2021 is very stoked. JP has stoked to play with john Mayer to um yeah, that was one of the coolest moments in my whole life. I don't think there's many people have influenced my songwriting more than him. I fell in love with songwriting listening to continue him as a 14 year old best song. Um it's hard. I know like stop this train.

Um if I have to pick one knife to my thumb, stop this train. That's it. We can't end on a better note than that JP Sachs man. Thank you. That was brilliant. See more of our conversation with JP Saxe. It's spout underscore podcast on ig or twitter and its spout podcast dot com. Be sure to subscribe and listen for our new episodes every sunday night at nine. The spout podcast is presented by Alpha Media and created by Phil Becker. It's About Yeah!.

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